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Search Results 0 to 47 of about 48 (some duplicates have been removed)
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assignment, he faces some critical challenges as the president's foreign policy opens stress sweat. it's different than ordinary sweat. it smells worse, and it can happen any time -- to anyone! like when i ran to catch the train to work and a draft blew my skirt up and everybody here saw my unmentionables. yeah, and they aren't even cute. hello, laundry day. no... stress sweat can happen to anyone, anytime -- and it smells worse than ordinary sweat. get 4x the protection against stress sweat. introducing new secret clinical strength stress response scent. ♪ introducing new secret clinical strength stress response scent. i need you. i feel so alone. but you're not alone. i knew you'd come. like i could stay away. you know i can't do this without you. you'll never have to. you're always there for me. shh! i'll get you a rental car. i could also use an umbrella. fall in love with progressive's claims service. >>> we're black back /* back with our roundtable. president and ceo of naacp ben jealous. incoming president of the heritage foundation, former senator jim demint. nbc news special
assignment, he faces some critical challenges as the president's foreign policy opens a new chapter. it's among the topics we will tackle with our political roundtable up next after this break. you can prevent gas with beano meltaways, or treat gas with these after you get it. now that's like sunblock before or sun burn cream later. oh, somebody out there's saying, now i get it! take beano before and there'll be no gas. [ coughs ] ♪ [ male announcer ] you can't let a cold keep you up tonight. vicks nyquil -- powerful nighttime 6-symptom cold & flu relief. ♪ >>> we're back with our roundtable. president and ceo of naacp ben jealous. incoming president of the heritage foundation, former senator jim demint. nbc news special correspondent for rock center ted koppel. nbc's own ted koppel. and associate editor for "the washington post," bob woodward. and nbc's chief foreign affairs correspondent andrea mitchell. welcome to all of you. a lot to get to. and as we react to paul ryan this morning, i want to show some of the headlines from the president's inaugural address. obama offers a libe
in american foreign policy in the late 1940s. if -- >> like when -- >> if there are two people that would get it. if this is a real deal, what you say, with talk radio -- >> i think it is. >> moving on this issue, and i think the bill -- >> let's also keep in mind that the democrats are trying to turn texas blue. there is work afoot to capitalize on the demographic question here. >> jody, this is my question. i feel like we're -- this is a big moment for the republican party in terms of brand and also policy. i haut this was an incredible moment when jim demint is asked about the comments that colin powell made about a dark vein of intolerance, the racism within the republican party, and also republican comments on legitimate rape and this is how jim demint, who is now president or incoming president of the heritage foundation, presumably a leading voice among conservatives, this is his answer. >> do you regret some of the comments about abortion, about rape. again, what colin powell were vailed racist comments from the party. >> david, the fact that we are losing over 3,000 unborn children a
of a foreign service officer. learning about foreign-policy around the dinner table each night to this service in combat -- his service in combat in vietnam. less well known is the story of this foreign policy work inside dissonant. -- the senate. his 90 overseas trips that he made in 28 years on foreign relations committee, his work to ensure free elections in the philippines, his work with aids in africa, his work as chairman of the new start treaty and his very public and successful diplomatic intervention in afghanistan, pakistan, and sudan. historians will judged his senate years on his impact on foreign policy much the same way so many people recognized ted kennedy's impact on domestic policy. from his many years in the u.s. senate, he has developed a very personal understanding that we represent not just states or governments, but also people. i once asked john why he loves the senate. he said it is the pride he feels in trying to get things done for people. for three years now, he has been working quietly to help a father from massachusetts, whose two sons were kidnapped and taken to
's foreign policy aide related for diplomacy and our presence throughout the world. if you let back -- look back to congress 20, 25 years ago, is essentially made up of people who have the relationship to world war ii and its aftermath in terms of the u.s. global engagement. the marshall plan and the rebuilding of japan in america's prisons. in the relationship also in the lessons and threat posed by the cold war. and those were very defining, major umbrella issues that produced great statesman. henry jackson and others on a bipartisan bill and water's edge, america's presence and engagement around the world. two superpowers, the umbrella that was held over the world stifled the regional and local factions and tensions that erupted after the end of the cold war. that all had a significant impact on the american people and commitment and support for the u.s. to be at bobo -- be globally engaged. it is the possibility of a five alarm fire and everybody's been to try to keep them from getting out of control. with the fall of the wall in the aftermath, there was the defining event and that was
a favorable opinion of her. it's an open question whether her tenure includes a standout foreign policy achievement. still unresolved issues include iran's nuclear program, the lack of a middle east peace process, and the raging war in syria. clinton made her final appearance on capitol hill nearly two weeks ago to testify about september's attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. it claimed the lives of the u.s. ambassador and three other americans. she took aim at senate republicans who accused the obama administration of deceiving the nation about what happened. >> the fact is we had four dead americans. was it because of a protest? or was it because guys out for a walk one night who decided they would go kill some americans? what difference, at this point, does it make? >> suarez: president obama, gave her high praise in a joint interview sunday with cbs's "60 minutes." >> i think hillary will go down as one of the finest secretary of states we've had. it has been a great collaboration over the last four years. ( cheers and applause ) >> suarez: clinton said her immediate go
think this speech given last night by this president represents the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since the vietnam. if it is carried out, i will resist it." the question continued on for months and months talking about what a disaster the surge would be even when it was clear the surge was succeeding. in march 2008, you said "the term quagmires could apply. some reject that term, but if that is not a quagmire, what is? even as late as august 29, 2011, in an interview with the "financial times" -- you said i disagree with president obama and his decision to surge in iraq as i did with president obama. do you stand by those comments? >> senator, i stand by them because i made them. >> were you right? where you write in your assessment? >> i would defer to the judgment of history to assert -- to sort that out. >> the committee deserves to know whether you are right or wrong about the search. >> i will explain why -- >> i want to know if you are right or wrong. it's a direct question. >> the surge assisted in the objective. >> will you please answer the questi
at a steady pace since he returned to office last month, retooling the economy, revising foreign policy and reviewing national defense. now he's taken time to pause and sum up his vision for the country. abe spoke before the diet for the first time since his liberal democratic party took power. the prime minister said the economy is his top priority. he noted deflation and the strong yen are shaking japanese people's belief that working hard will bring rewards. >> translator: i will restore a strong economy and unshakable determination. i will press ahead with my three areas of economic policy, bold monetary measures, a fiscal policy and a growth strategy that induces private investment. >> abe urged lawmakers to swiftly pass extra budget bills for the current fiscal year to pay for stimulus measures. he said his spending measures won't go on forever and that he aims to achieve healthy public finances. the prime minister then turned his attention to diplomacy and national security. he said japanese and u.s. leaders should strengthen their alliance to restore the tight bond their countri
foreign-policy would be? xp did not go that far. he had three main parts aside from syria, issuing an offer and a warning to iran, and a warning if the us policy is not containment, but to prevent iran from getting a nuclear weapon and his offer is they are ready to have talks but the supreme leader needs to be serious about negotiations. that was one thing. another theme was a reset with russia and he made it clear there were differences with russian leadership. it clearly sounds like they will work together on and ad hoc transitional basis. with europe, they said the good news and the bad news is we are not going anywhere, reaffirming the commitment to europe. >> that is a reassuring message. melinda, thank you very much. john kerry has been sworn in as us secretary of state, replacing hillary clinton to my taking his at a small ceremony in washington, dc. he has been in public life for three decades and is the 68 secretary of state, and among his priorities would be removing troops from afghanistan and improving us relations with pakistan. french president francois hollande has
to be devoted to? devoted to economics or foreign policy, iraq and iran, what ever it should be. at cbs we made a deal about never giving you the questions or categories, because you are supposed to keep that distance. >> do you feel any sense of discomfort at having to participate in what you did this time. >> this is the first time i have that this way and this was new, and basically -- janet called me and said, this time we want to divide this up into six categories, and i said, fine. you did not have to say in what order were anything but i think to in really don't need today's sophisticated world. >> but you did. and this hadn't happened before so why was the change. >> with the commission said to me was that they were keen on two things. and the commission is running this. the three of us and candy are not rolling this. >> by your jim lehrer. >> -- you are jim lehrer. >> this is how they ask and here is how the imitation goes to the debate. and if under these rules, would you do this certain fang -- i found out what they propose and made the decision, i would do that and here is what they
are subscribers and readers which we've carried out in collaboration with foreign policy and lots of other conferences and publications around south asian affairs. so anyway, we're all very pleased to have this occasion to bring us together, and the purpose today is to have a very serious discussion about the ideas and subjects that are in the book and that are, obviously, still alive as dilemmas for american foreign policy. so let me introduce peter and welcome him to the podium. thank you. [applause] >> thank you, steve, and thank you for all of you coming today and for c-span for covering this. steve was instrumental in making this whole project happen, so i'm very grateful to him. thank you, also, to oxford university press which published the book and did, i think, a fine job in terms of presenting the material. thank you, also, to my co-editor, katherine, and thanks also to people here at the foundation, brian fishman, patrick doherty, jennifer roland and andrew lev witch who were also involved in making the book possible. as steve indicated, the reason we felt this project was neces
to be devoted to? but -- what is this 15 minutes going to be devoted to? devoted to economics or foreign policy, iraq and iran, what ever it should be. at cbs we made a deal about never giving you the questions or categories, because you are supposed to keep that distance. >> do you feel any sense of discomfort at having to participate in what you did this time. >> this is the first time i have that this way and this was new, and basically -- janet called me and said, this time we want to divide this up into six categories, and i said, fine. you did not have to say in what order were anything but i think -- you really don't need to in today's sophisticated world. >> but you did. and this hadn't happened before so why was the change. >> with the commission said to me was that they were keen on two things. and the commission is running this. the three of us and candy are not rolling this. >> by your jim lehrer. >> -- you are jim lehrer. >> this is how they ask and here is how the imitation goes to the debate. and if under these rules, would you do this certain fang -- i found out what they propos
too difficult, and they become foreign policy presidents in part because they have so much more leeway. but for barack obama, i think this happened early. >> tay, we got the obama plan for leaving iraq... >> president obama announced the current phase of the war is coming to an end... >> narrator: early on, obama had set a timetable for withdrawing troops from iraq. >> within 19 months... >> he came into office promising to get out of iraq. his rise had a lot to do with his opposition to the iraq war. and i don't think he ever looked back. >> narrator: but there was another, secret side to obama's approach to the world. candidate obama had been critical of much of the bush administration's top secret war on terror. as president, it was a different story. >> his people made it clear that in the terrorism arena, he was going to be as tough if not tougher than the bush people. he was going to be extraordinarily aggressive. he and his people reviewed all existing ongoing cia covert operations and with the exception of aggressive interrogations, endorsed all of them, and doubled down on a n
of a foreign-policy think tank. at his confirmation hearing today, he had some back and forth with former colleagues, including senator john mccain. that exchange is about an hour and a half into the hearing. later, we will get your thoughts about the nomination and hearing on our phone lines at 11:00 p.m. eastern, 8:00 pacific. carl levin chairs the armed services committee and makes the opening statement. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] >> good morning, everybody. the committee meets today to consider the nomination of former senator chuck hagel to be secretary of defense. before i begin, i want to first welcome senator inhofe as the new ranking republican on our committee, succeeding senator mccain. senator mccain has been a great partner over the past six years, and i thank him for all the work he has done to get bills enacted, his leadership on a host of issues, his support for the work of this committee, and for always keeping our hearings likely. -- lively. senator inhofe has shown his strong commitmen
against foreign persons, i think, is troubling from a moral, ethical, and policy point of view. but i don't subscribe to the fact that it's illegal under u.s. law. and that's the law that the president is bound by the constitution to follow. my focus has been primarily, and i'm not saying it's a good program. i'm just saying that i think it's a moral policy question rather than a legal one primarily for the president. i focus primarily on the targeted killing of american citizens, which does bring into play the united states constitution and the rule of law in the united states. and i'm very troubled about that aspect of it. >> can you help us understand how this official program of targeted killing works? >> apparently, the agencies, primarily the pentagon and the c.i.a. nominate people to be on the list. and it goes through what the white house promises is a very rigorous process of review to determine if those people should or should not be on the list. we don't know exactly what the standard is. but it involves a number of criteria, including whether the host country, the country in w
the democrats lost power in 1980, i became completely responsible on foreign policy, completely. when they were in power, they had to deal with the soviets. carter was weak, but when the soviets invaded afghanistan, he had the boycott, the olympic boycott. and he toughened up. one of the things he proposed was that the germans had wanted the americans to develop a neutron bomb. but instead, carter didn't want to do that. so he proposed to put in germany and in britain short range -- medium-range nuclear weapons as an answer to the soviets who had put medium weapons in eastern europe. that was a carter administration policy. reagan comes in in 1981 and democrats completely collapse. >> i was a speechwriter in 1980. i had nothing to do with him in 1984. but he and gary hart ran together to see who was the first to have been forced the nuclear freeze, which was the stupidest idea in the history of the nuclear age. i joined the new republican in 1981 on inauguration by the way. i wrote an editorial denouncing the freeze as an illusion and deception, which incidentally caused the most canceled subsc
at the national committee on american foreign policy and editor of the bimonthly journal "american foreign-policy interests." he was also on the senior advisory group of the u.s. africa command, since its creation. and was vice president for the position of the study of the middle east and africa. let's hear more from the commander of u.s. africa command at howard university last week. [video clip] >> our mission is to protect america and american interests from threats that may emerge from the continent of africa. we see this manifest itself in somalia with al-shabab. in the maghreb in the sahara, as putting out now in mali with al qaeda in the lands of the islamic maghreb. ansar al din as well. in nigeria, the existence of boko haram. these organizations all focused on undermining the governments of those countries and establishing their own regime of control outside of legitimate government control. i am very concerned about each of those individual entities such as al-shabab and the others, it is increasingly the coordination, the synchronization of efforts of those different organizations th
in 2008, amy has covered a variety of topics including foreign policy, national security, political advertising and the election of the new supreme court justice on nj's ninth justice blog. prior to nj, she was a staff rir writer for freedom of the press. our report from the automakers' panel will include -- and i'd love you all to be able to hear these folks' names as i introduce them -- great. robert bienenfeld, environment and energy strategy product regulatory office, american honda motor company incorporated. reg modlin, director regulatory affairs, chrysler llc. tom stricker, vice president of technical and regulatory affairs and energy and environmental research, toyota motors, north america incorporated. amy, if you can, if you'd like to get started, um, we'll try to get the audience to quiet down. >> well, thank you for that great introduction. we have two out of three of our panelists, so i guess that's a two-thirds majority, so i think we're going to go ahead and get started. i think that was a great discussion we just had with jeep that mccarthy, mary nichols and the oth
opponent, now thinks he is wrong, especially about this comment. >> the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since vietnam if it's carried out. >> were you correct or incorrect? yes or no? >> my reference to the surge being a dangerous -- >> are you refusing to answer, mr. hagel? >> well, i am not going to give you a yes or no answer on a lot of things. >> so you refuse to answer that question. >> watching this tension, even outright scorn, you'd never know these two men were once the closest of friends and political allies n fact, when mccain ran for president in 2000 ark voter asked who he would want in his cabinet. listen to mccain's answer. >> as far as secretary of defense is concerned, there's a lot of people that could do that. one of them i think is senator chuck hagel could do that kind of job. >> reporter: that's right. the same man mccain lit into 13 years later in a confirmation hearing for the same post in president obama's administration. but they once had a bond even tighter than senate colleagues. a shared experience in vietnam. in fact, they were so c
be the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since vietnam? were you correct or incorrect, yes or no? >> my reference to the surge being the most dangerous -- >> senator hagel, the question is, were you right or wrong? that's a pretty straightforward question. i would like answer whether you're right or wrong and then you're free to elaborate. >> well, i'm not going to give you a yes or no answer. >> well let the record show you refused to answer that question. martha: that was uncomfortable. joined by missouri republican senator roy blunt who was in that hearing yesterday. senator, good morning. welcome, good to have you here today. we were arch watching this on television. what was it like in the room? >> well, my guess is in the room it was, it was a little less tense maybe than it appeared on television but certainly as these hearings go it was a pretty intense hearing. i didn't serve with senator hagel in the senate. he left the senate long before i got here. i served with him when he was in the house and i was in the senate. i like him. i admire his service in vietnam. hi
also to develop a foreign policy that reflects, again, the dynamics of the region as they really are today. lastly, i think this is an opportunity for the committee to finally do the work that it should have been doing for years. when you read the record and realize we have never done an authorization of the state department in the six years i have been here, we have never looked at how foreign aid has been spent. we have never done a top to bottom review. it is something people like you come to this position, look at as something that is healthy. there was mention of cost. i was disappointed with the arb when the first thing that came out of the mouths of people i respect was money, money, money. this committee would have no idea whether the appropriate amount of money is being spent or if that could have prevented what was happening -- what happened because we have never had an authorization. i want to close again by thanking you for your service, thanking you for your friendship, thanking you for your transparency, and i certainly look forward to your testimony. i know it will
us on set, former foreign policy adviser to the bush administration and former adviser to the romney campaign, dan senor. and joining us from washington, former astronaut, founder of americans for responsible solutions pac and husband of former congresswoman gabby giffords, captain mark kelly. captain kelly testified yesterday at the senate hearing on cushing gun violence, but we also saw others that testified yesterday. >> captain, there were parts of the testimony yesterday that just looked like a freak show. >> not your part. >> you know, i know lindsey and friends, but these arguments are just insane. >> they're stunning. >> and you had, of course, wayne lapierre out there talking about how he was even against background checks, that 91% of americans support. these people are driving my party over the cliff. but your wife, obviously, very moving testimony. >> i don't know how you sat there next to your wife listening to that. >> tell us, what was it like for you yesterday? >> well, by the time the other folks started testifying, gabby was already gone and in a back room and watch
are not great because of the policies of the turkish government both internally and in the broader region interfering with the peace process, turning against israel. but their economic policies have been very receptive to foreign in vetment. a very free market government even though it is islamist in its social policy. kind of a mixed situation. i think the turmoil in syria, the risk, the threat of iran all make a very complex situation with historical i think that is tensions one of the reasons in the absence of a clear and firm american policy why there is -- there is so much turmoil and so much risk. >> greta: is turkey sort of our proxy in terms of helping the rebels in syria? >> well, i think because there are so many refugees inside turkey who need humanitarian assistance that those refugee camps also provide r and r bases for the opposition in syria and as just as a logistical matter i think the turks don't want the assad regime to continue but they are worried that the opposition does contain substantial terrorist elements including al-qaeda. one of these things where it is like c
policies make sense. and there are very few foreign service officers, spread out all over the world, and they are your best line of defense against ad policy. -- bad policuy. host: we want to take our viewers to a live event at the brookings institute. it is the evolution of joints -- a force operations command and the pursuit of al qaeda in iraq. it is a conversation with general stanley mcchrystal, also featuring mike o'hanlon of brookings. thanks so much for joining us on "the washington journal." [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] mf good morning, everyone. welcome to brookings. thanks for coming out. it is an unusual treat, even at a place where we have such amazing events, to have general stanley mcchrystal here today. i am mike o'hanlon, one of the members of the 21st century defense initiative. we are hosting this event with bruce riddell, who runs the -- first readout -- bruce riddell .- bruce ridedel, general mcchrystal build up an organization into what was the state-of-the-art capability that u
Search Results 0 to 47 of about 48 (some duplicates have been removed)